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Mormon Link to Sasquatch?

Sasquatch with a Mormon connection? You decide!

Note: this page is not meant as a reference to be discussed at the Investigative Society's Night of Sasquatch. We do not care to consider it in our discussions, but mention it here only as reference. We know that a spirit of "intrigue" with evil and the devil, demons, and evil spirits only invites such influences. We of the U.C.S.I.S. don't care to foster that spirit of "intrigue." This page is intended to answer questions with authoritative sighting of the reference below for any who have heard the account before, but are not sure as to it's validity. There will be no official forum or recognition of this following account in our Night of Sasquatch event.

 

David W. Patten has been called the "first" martyr of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At Crooked River Missouri, Mormon militia under David W. Patten and state militia under Samuel Bogart clashed in a predawn battle, 25 October 1838. Elder Patten, a member of the Council of the Twelve, was fatally wounded in the encounter.

Taken from The Miracle of Forgiveness written by LDS Church Apostle and later President Spencer W. Kimball

The Murderer

John wrote that "no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him." The murderer denies himself salvation in the celestial kingdom, and in this sense he cannot be forgiven for his crime.

The instance of the first murder is instructive. Though thoroughly taught the gospel by his parents, Cain "loved Satan more than God." He became rebellious, "carnal, sensual, and devilish." Cain was to become the father of Satan's lies and to be called perdition. His culminating sin was the murder of his brother Abel, which he did by secret covenant with Satan and to gain Abel's possessions. As a punishment the Lord consigned the wicked Cain to be a fugitive and a vagabond and placed a mark upon him which would reveal his identity.

On the sad character Cain, an interesting story comes to us from Lycurgus A. Wilson's book on the life of David W. Patten. From the book I quote an extract from a letter by Abraham O. Smoot giving his recollection of David Pattern's account of meeting "a very remarkable person who had represented himself as being Cain."

As I was riding along the road on my mule I suddenly noticed a very strange personage walking beside me.... His head was about even with my shoulders as I sat in my saddle. He wore no clothing, but was covered with hair. His skin was very dark. I asked him where he dwelt and he replied that he had no home, that he was a wanderer in the earth and traveled to and fro. He said he was a very miserable creature, that he had earnestly sought death during his sojourn upon the earth, but that he could not die, and his mission was to destroy the souls of men. About the time he expressed himself thus, I rebuked him in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by virtue of the Holy Priesthood, and commanded him to go hence, and he immediately departed out of my sight....(Lycurgus A. Wilson, Life of David W. Patten [Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1900], p. 50., as quoted by Spencer W. Kimball, The Miracle of Forgiveness [Salt Lake City, Bookcraft, Inc.]18th printing 1991 p.p. 127-128.)

 

About David W. Patten's last day's

The Church prospered for a time in northern Missouri. The population grew rapidly, and temple sites were dedicated in Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman. However, there continued to be conflicts among some of the Saints. Several leaders were excommunicated, including Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer.

In addition to dissension among some Church members, there continued to be conflicts with other residents in northern Missouri. In 1838, mobs and militia members began more attacks. On 25 October, three Church members were killed during a battle at Crooked River, including David W. Patten, an Apostle. Two days later, Governor Lilburn W. Boggs of Missouri issued an order that “the Mormons must be treated as enemies and must be exterminated or driven from the state” (History of the Church, 3:175).

This depression on high ground is all that remains here of the road from Far West to Crooked River in Ray County. Down this path now overgrown by trees and brush, Mormon apostle David W. Patten, captain of the Mormon militia from Caldwell County, led his men in the early morning of 25 October 1838 in an attempt to rescue three Mormon prisoners held by Captain Samuel Bogart of the state militia. Seconds later, Bogart’s pickets opened fire and the Battle of Crooked River began.

Bogart was camped in the field in the foreground with the ford a few rods to the rear. Elder Patten’s men came down the ridge in the distance. The skirmish wounded several Saints, killed Patrick O’Banion and Gideon Carter, and fatally wounded Elder Patten.

The Crooked River ford twelve miles south of Far West and about two miles southeast of present-day Elmira, Ray County. The ford, a limestone outcropping, is covered by heavy spring runoff in this photo.


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